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Partial LPA Revocation

By | LPA | No Comments

After an LPA has been signed, it could be several months or years before the document is registered with the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG), or before they even need to be used. During this time the circumstances may change, and the donor may decide that he/she no longer wishes for one or more of their attorneys to act on their behalf, or an attorney may decide they no longer wish to act. In exceptional cases, an attorney may believe that another attorney is no longer trustworthy and does not wish that attorney to act. The solution to these issues can depend on the exact circumstances at the time, such as if the donor has capacity or not, or if the LPA is registered. If the donor still has the capacity to make decisions, and the LPA is unregistered, they have two choices. They could write a Partial Deed…

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LPA’s – Instructions and Preferences

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In Lasting Power of Attorney documents, the donor can choose to place rules or guidance within the documents themselves to state exactly how they would like the attorneys to approach certain decisions should they lose the capacity to make decisions for themselves. This can be achieved on Section 7, Page 8 of each type of LPA under Instructions and Preferences. Placing a preference into an LPA is a non-binding wish that the attorneys may consider when making decisions on behalf of the donor. An example of this could be; ‘I would like to donate £2 a month to Cancer Research UK’. When the attorneys are making any decisions regarding any preferences specified in the LPAs, they must consider if this is how the donor would act, and if this is in the best interest of the donor. If the attorneys deem such a decision is not in the best interest…

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Attorneys making gifts under an LPA

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Subject to instructions saying otherwise, attorneys of a Property and Affairs Lasting Power of Attorney have a power to make: Gifts to charities that the donor may have given to; and Gifts to family members, friends or acquaintances of the donor on ‘customary occasions’ A customary occasion for this purpose means occasions where is it usual for gifts to be given, for example a birth, a birthday, a wedding/civil partnership, an anniversary or religious holidays. Any gifts made by attorneys must be reasonable in regards to the size of the donor’s estate and their expected current and future needs. The type of gifts the donor used to make when they had capacity should also be considered although just because a donor used to make generous gifts, it does not mean that it would be reasonable for the attorneys to make similar sized gifts, for example if care home fees have…

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Administration Notes

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Sorry, this section of the WillPack website is for Members Only. If you would like to join WillPack you can register by downloading and completing our application forms.

If you are already a member you can log in to the Members Area for full access. If you have forgotten your password, you can reset it here.

Should you require any further assistance, please contact us and we will endeavour to assist you as soon as possible.

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How Attorneys Can Act

By | LPA, Uncategorized | No Comments

Where a client is wishing to appoint multiple attorneys or replacement attorneys, it should be considered how these attorneys are to act. Multiple attorneys can either act jointly, jointly and severally or jointly in some matters and jointly and severally in others. Attorneys acting jointly must make decisions for the donor together and must all agree. Attorneys acting jointly and severally on the other hand can either act together or independently. Attorneys may also act jointly in some matters and jointly and severally in others. An example of this being where a donor wishes the attorneys for the Property and Affairs LPA to act jointly in relation to matters worth over £10,000 and to act jointly and severally in all other matters. On first glance, attorneys acting jointly seems very desirable. It provides an extra safeguard as all must act together and agree on the action, restricting the possibility for…

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Discretionary Fund Management

By | LPA | No Comments

Following guidance and suggested wording issued by the Office of the Public Guardian with regards to Discretionary Fund Management (DFM), we looked at this in great detail and continued to review the situation. WillPack along with a number of other organisations took the decision not include the instruction due to uncertainty around the issue. Having taken further legal and professional advice after talking to a number of our IFA’s, we will now be issuing a new LPA instruction form to include the DFM instruction as a yes or no option. However, caution will need to be taken as The Office of the Public Guardian cannot guarantee that the bank/ organisation will accept the suggested wording and it is advisable that the donor contacts the bank/ discretionary investment manager to confirm in writing that they will accept the wording; or they seek their own legal advice as appropriate before the LPA…

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Power of Attorney

Common Errors in the Signing of Lasting Powers of Attorney

By | LPA | No Comments

As an important legal document, a Lasting Power of Attorney needs to be legible and the Office of the Public Guardian will reject any documents that do not meet their standards. Some common errors are detailed below: Dates The dating of a Lasting Power of Attorney is extremely important and the Office of the Public Guardian require these documents to be signed and dated in a precise order (please see our Signing Guidance). Any ambiguity in the dates will cause the Lasting Power of Attorney to be rejected. Please take the time to slowly and carefully write the date in the appropriate boxes (with one digit per box). Common errors are 5s that look like 8s, 0s looking like 6s or 9s, and 7s that look like 9s. It is also important to note that you should not overwrite the date if a mistake is made. Additionally, a number of…

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Revoking an LPA or an EPA

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Revocation of EPA’s and LPA’s   Occasionally, a donor may review their Enduring/Lasting Power of Attorney and realise that their circumstances have changed since the documents were signed, and will therefore wish to change them. To achieve this, the documents need to be formally revoked.   With an Enduring Power of Attorney, the process is simple. As the document will not have been registered previously, the Office of the Public Guardian’s guidance states that a Deed of Revocation is required. This Deed will require the details of themselves and all the attorneys appointed. This includes full names and addresses. The Deed will also need to specify the date the donor granted Power of Attorney to the attorneys, i.e. the date signed. This will need to be signed and dated by the client and then witnessed by an individual independent from the Enduring Power of Attorney and kept with the Enduring…

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Power of Attorney

Certificate Providers

By | LPA | No Comments

Certificate Providers A Certificate Provider is an independent person who signs a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) to certify that at the time of signing, they are aware that the donor understands the purpose and scope of authority given by the LPA, that no fraud or undue pressure is used to influence the donor into making the LPA and that there is nothing else which could prevent the LPA from being created. Certificate Providers must either be a person who the donor has known for at least two years as more than an acquaintance (for example a friend or colleague), or a person with relevant professional skills (such as a medical professional, social worker or legal professional). The Office of the Public Guardian’s official guidance provides a number of persons who cannot act as Certificate Provider: an attorney or replacement attorney in the current LPA or another other LPA or…

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Signing a Lasting Power of Attorney

By | LPA | No Comments

Signing a Lasting Power of Attorney In order for a Lasting Power of Attorney to be completed correctly it must be signed and dated in a certain order, with any deviation risking it being returned from the Office of the Public Guardian unregistered. As the Office of the Public Guardian can take up to 16 weeks to register a Lasting Power of Attorney, following these steps will help keep the waiting time to a minimum. Section 5—Life-sustaining treatment Only applicable to Health and Welfare Lasting Powers of Attorney. This page must be signed, dated and witnessed at the same time as Section 9 (detailed below). It should be noted that only one box needs to be signed. Any errors on this page will result in Option B (not giving authority for life-sustaining treatment) being the default. Section 9—Signature: donor This page, and any appropriate continuation sheets, must be signed and…

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