Administration Notes

Administration Notes

By | Admin | No Comments

It has now been a couple of months since GDPR was introduced and the dust has settled slightly. New administrative procedures have been implemented and it is business as usual. WillPack has had a few requests for clarification on the reasons behind the choices we took regarding GDPR so this article will hopefully explain those. Background For WillPack the biggest change has been in how we receive instructions and send out drafts. One of things to come out of GDPR was that you can’t send personal data via email. GDPR defines personal data as: “…any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (“data subject”); an identifiable person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity…

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Disabled/Vulnerable Person’s Discretionary Trusts

By | Guardianship, Inheritance, Legal, Trustees, Trusts, Wills | 2 Comments

The Disabled/Vulnerable Person’s Discretionary Trusts These are useful trusts to use when your client has a child or another relative with a disability and who needs constant support. If this person inherits from a Will directly, this may affect what disability benefits they may receive. We can put the assets into a Discretionary Trust with the disabled beneficiary as the Principal Beneficiary. As with any other Discretionary Trust, there must be more than 1 appointed beneficiary. The main reason for this is because whenever a person in receipt of disability benefits receives an inheritance, the Local Authority will want to assess them. This means if they hold over a certain threshold (this can vary) the Local Authority can cut the benefits that person receives. If the estate of the testator is due to pay any IHT. This will need paying before the assets are passed into the Trust, at 40%…

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Commercial LPAs. What they are and what they do!

By | Commercial, Legal, LPA, Uncategorized | No Comments

Commercial LPA Many business owners, partners and directors may not consider what would happen to their business should they be unable to make decisions for their business in the case of their mental incapacity, or if they plan on leaving the country for a long period of time. The answer could be an LPA. For many Partnerships, LLPs and companies, under the Mental Health Discrimination Act 2013, in the case of a Director/Partner losing their mental capacity they cannot be removed as a Director for that company. This will leave the company in a difficult position, where the best way around this, is to apply for a Deputyship, which as we all know is a timely and costly procedure. For a Sole Trader, if they lose their mental capacity, in most cases this would result in losing the business as there is no one able to take it on and…

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Introduction to Guardianship

By | Guardianship, Inheritance, Intestacy, Legal, Uncategorized, Wills | No Comments

Appointment of Testamentary Guardians The appointment of testamentary guardians is rarely considered by parent, but it is highly desirable that they should consider who should look after their children if both were to lose their lives while their children are under eighteen. The appointment of a testamentary guardian can only be made by a person with parental responsibility. What is Parental Responsibility? The legal definition of Parental Responsibility is the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority which by law a parent has in relation to their child and their property. This includes: Providing them with a home maintaining them Choices about their medical treatment How and where they are educated Deciding their name It does not include a duty to maintain the child financially, all parents have this duty regardless of whether they have parental responsibility. More than one person can have parental responsibility for the same child at the…

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Flexible Life Interest Trust

By | Inheritance, Legal, Property, Trustees, Wills | One Comment

Flexible Life Interest Trust  Due to more complex estates and greater wealth, greater flexibility is essential to cope with any future changes to the family structure (such as new family members) and changes in the tax regime. The best way to gain the maximum flexibility is by the use of a Flexible Life Interest Trust (FLIT). How a FLIT works The residue of the estate is held on trust for the surviving spouse or civil partner for their lifetime, after which or when the life interest is ended, a discretionary trust will arise in favour of nominated beneficiaries, usually children and issue. Trustees are given a number of powers. They can grant the income of the trust fund to the surviving spouse/civil partner and have the power to grant the capital of the trust fund to them as either absolutely or as a loan, which would be repaid when the…

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Roles of executors and trustees

By | Executor, Inheritance, Legal, Trustees, Wills | 2 Comments

Who are trustees? A trustee is someone who is given legal responsibility to hold property in the best interest of or for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiaries). As the name implies, the trustee acts under a “trust” to do what is best and to act in the interests of the beneficiaries and not themselves. Number of trustees No more than 4 trustees can be appointed to act at once, however reserve trustees can be appointed. If the property of the trust includes land a minimum of 2 trustees must be appointed. Where a Trust is inserted within a Will in favour of a spouse (as a beneficiary) upon first death, it is almost always advisable that a MINIMUM of two other trustees be appointed to act jointly with the spouse. This is in order to prevent any conflict of interest due to the spouse acting as the sole…

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Intestacy

By | Inheritance, Intestacy, Legal, Wills | No Comments

Intestacy can be a complicated issue. Difficult to wrap your head around the ins and outs, if you haven’t worked much with it before. Below we’ve outlined the the rules in a simple flowchart to give you an idea on who will benefit from your estate if you a) have no Will or b) have no further levels of residue outlined in your Will.

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